Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 2013, Page 62

Books

Solving 9-11: The Deception That Changed the World

By Christopher Bollyn, 2012, paperback, 325 pp. List: $24.99; AET: $22.

Reviewed by James G. Smart

As terrified workers jumped from the burning towers on 9/11, five Mossad agents celebrated the event across the river in New Jersey. They high-fived each other, danced and took photos of themselves in obvious delight. Notified, the police apprehended them. They had Palestinian clothing in their truck. They failed lie detector tests, but were released. Back home they admitted on Israeli television they had come to New York "to record the event."

Two hours before the first plane struck the World Trade Center, the Mossad-owned Odigo messaging system advised its members "to the precise minute" the time of the attack.

These events in particular caused Christopher Bollyn, an independent journalist, to suspect that Israel was a key player behind 9/11.

In his book Bollyn proposes that "9-11 was an elaborate false-flag deception carried out by Israeli military intelligence and Zionist agents" in the United States. He states that "Israeli nationals or dedicated Zionists [can be found] at every key point of the 9-11 matrix."

The author begins with a short review of Israel's successful false flag operations. He then traces the germ of the 9/11 project to Mossad head Isser Harel, who informed an American visitor in 1979 that "your tallest building will be the…symbol they [the terrorists] will hit."

The next step was getting control of security for the World Trade Center, which the Mossad actually did—briefly—in 1987, under the name of Atwell Security. This company soon lost its contract due to the criminal past of one of its officers.

Thereafter, according to Bollyn, the Mossad worked through dual-allegiance Americans like Jeremy Kroll and Maurice Greenberg. Indeed, Kroll Associates was in charge of security at the World Trade Center from the early 1990s until after 9/11. The first plane hit the security rooms of a Greenberg company in the North Tower. This truly was, says Bollyn, "an amazing coincidence."

At this crucial point, however, Bollyn's storyline breaks down. He may infer, but does not even suggest, that Kroll Associates allowed Mossad agents into the buildings to rig them for demolition. He merely states that the residue of the detonating material thermite was scientifically proved to be in the dust. He does not speculate how it got there.

The author makes a very strong case in identifying numerous private companies in America dealing in information and technology with roots either directly to Mossad-founded companies or companies officered by committed partisans of Israel. These companies proved to be the "Achilles' heel" of U.S. defense.

Companies, often small, such as Ptech, Mitre, and U.S. Aviation, provided or had access to highly important defense information. Such companies helped develop the software to control hijacking—and well before 9/11. Passenger planes, like drones, could, and can, be controlled by "ground pilots." Obviously this software alone could have stopped the airplanes of 9/11.

Further, facility with this new software was used to foil "a military response to the emergency as it developed."

The author concludes with the issues of the hasty clean-up of the crime scene and appointments to the Justice Department. Again committed Israelists turn up in these areas.

Hugo Neu-Schnitzer Corporation and one of Israeli Marc Rich's companies took part in shipping off the crime scene evidence from Ground Zero. An interesting aspect of the clean-up was the dredging of the two-mile long Claremont Channel in August 2001—the month before the attacks—from shallows of only 10 feet deep to a depth of 35 feet so that ocean-going vessels could quickly haul the steel away.

The appointments of Michael Chertoff, Michael Mukasey and Alvin Hellerstein to the Justice Department were keys in preventing court cases of the 76 victim families who refused to take the government's compensation money from proceeding to trial.

Bollyn is often meandering and difficult to follow; nonetheless, he opens a path that needs to be pursued. The author is to be complimented for pursuing an idea that many people have long suspected but have wished to avoid. 


James G. Smart is professor emeritus, Keene State College, and a member of PEN (Palestine Education Network), a project of NH Peace Action.

Additional information